Angola seeks forestry revenue

  • Secretário de estado para os Recursos Florestais, André de Jesus Moda
Luanda - The world is marking this Sunday (21 March) the International Day of Forests, under the slogan "Forest restoration: a path to recovery and welfare", in a context marked by the Covid-19 pandemic, degradation and loss of that biodiversity, which has hard repercussions on the Angolan economy.

Like other countries that engage in forestry, in Angola these terrestrial ecosystems have great economic value and utility in different areas, with unquestionable relevance to the diet, health and well-being of the populations living in the surrounding areas, but still generate revenues below expectations.

The country has a large forest area, especially the Mayombe Forest in Cabinda province (north of the country), and potential for a wood processing industry, an activity that still contributes little to public revenue.

However, in recent years the market for the transformation of this natural resource has already started to show timid signs of growth that could help diversify the economy in the future.

Only between December 2020 and February this year, the State collected about USD 19 million and 15 million Euros with the export of national wood, according to data recently released by the Secretary of State for Forests, André Moda.

Specifically, the sector expected to produce 500,000 cubic metres of wood, through native forest, but "could not exploit at least half of this amount, for financial reasons", nor "exports 80% of the wood produced, for not having a fine-tuned industrialisation".

 

Like other countries that engage in forestry, in Angola these terrestrial ecosystems have great economic value and utility in different areas, with unquestionable relevance to the diet, health and well-being of the populations living in the surrounding areas, but still generate revenues below expectations.

The country has a large forest area, especially the Mayombe Forest in Cabinda province (north of the country), and potential for a wood processing industry, an activity that still contributes little to public revenue.

However, in recent years the market for the transformation of this natural resource has already started to show timid signs of growth that could help diversify the economy in the future.

Only between December 2020 and February this year, the State collected about USD 19 million and 15 million Euros with the export of national wood, according to data recently released by the Secretary of State for Forests, André Moda.

Specifically, the sector expected to produce 500,000 cubic metres of wood, through native forest, but "could not exploit at least half of this amount, for financial reasons", nor "exports 80% of the wood produced, for not having a fine-tuned industrialisation".