Coronavirus digest: Denmark reports two blood-clot cases after AstraZeneca jab

  • Vaccine against Covid-19
Denmark says two people have developed blood clots and cerebral hemorrhage after receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine. Dozens of people have been arrested at an anti-lockdown protest in London. Follow DW for the latest.

Danish officials on Saturday reported two cases of blood clots and cerebral hemorrhage in people who had recently received the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccination.

The Capital Region of Denmark, the authority that runs public hospitals in Copenhagen, said that one of the people had died. Both were hospital staff and had received the AstraZeneca vaccine less than two weeks before becoming ill, it said. It was not reported when the people had developed the symptoms.

Denmark put use of the vaccine on hold on March 11 and has not yet resumed use, unlike several other countries that temporarily suspended use of the vaccine over blood clotting fears.

However, the World Health Organization (WHO), based in Geneva, Switzerland, said countries should keep using the AstraZeneca vaccine, stressing once again that the jab's benefits outweigh the risks.

"COVID-19 is a deadly disease and the AstraZeneca vaccine can prevent it," the UN agency's Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters at an online press briefing.

The WHO's backing for the British-developed serum comes after EU regulators confirmed it was safe after an emergency probe into links with blood clotting.

Source: https://www.dw.com

Danish officials on Saturday reported two cases of blood clots and cerebral hemorrhage in people who had recently received the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccination.

The Capital Region of Denmark, the authority that runs public hospitals in Copenhagen, said that one of the people had died. Both were hospital staff and had received the AstraZeneca vaccine less than two weeks before becoming ill, it said. It was not reported when the people had developed the symptoms.

Denmark put use of the vaccine on hold on March 11 and has not yet resumed use, unlike several other countries that temporarily suspended use of the vaccine over blood clotting fears.

However, the World Health Organization (WHO), based in Geneva, Switzerland, said countries should keep using the AstraZeneca vaccine, stressing once again that the jab's benefits outweigh the risks.

"COVID-19 is a deadly disease and the AstraZeneca vaccine can prevent it," the UN agency's Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters at an online press briefing.

The WHO's backing for the British-developed serum comes after EU regulators confirmed it was safe after an emergency probe into links with blood clotting.

Source: https://www.dw.com