Adverse effect of constitution review on elections ruled out

  • Ministers discuss Constitution review at a press conference
Luanda – The minister of State and Head of the Civil Affairs Office to the President ruled out that the review of the Constitution could negatively affect the holding of elections in 2022.

 

Speaking at a press conference on Tuesday in Luanda to clarify aspects linked to the President’s Constitution review initiative, Adão de Almeida said “there is no direct relation between the elections and the Constitution review (…) and therefore there is no fearing postponement.”

He stated that the new proposal paves the way for debate, aiming at the construction of society of justice and social progress.

The minister deplored that several political parties mentioned the need for a Constitution review failed to come up with concrete proposals on parts of the text that should be changed.

According to article 233 of the Constitution in force since 5 February 2010, the initiative to review the Constitution belongs to the Head of State or to a third of the National Assembly sitting MPs.

The National Assembly has the power to review the Constitution upon five years from coming into force or after its latest review.

It can also be altered at any time, once so decided by at least two thirds of the House serving members.

 

Speaking at a press conference on Tuesday in Luanda to clarify aspects linked to the President’s Constitution review initiative, Adão de Almeida said “there is no direct relation between the elections and the Constitution review (…) and therefore there is no fearing postponement.”

He stated that the new proposal paves the way for debate, aiming at the construction of society of justice and social progress.

The minister deplored that several political parties mentioned the need for a Constitution review failed to come up with concrete proposals on parts of the text that should be changed.

According to article 233 of the Constitution in force since 5 February 2010, the initiative to review the Constitution belongs to the Head of State or to a third of the National Assembly sitting MPs.

The National Assembly has the power to review the Constitution upon five years from coming into force or after its latest review.

It can also be altered at any time, once so decided by at least two thirds of the House serving members.